ISTE 5: Technology Operations and Concepts

Trigger Question: Are there up-to-date high school lessons plans designed to educate students on technological privacy/safety issues and strategies to maintain a positive digital footprint?

Though the majority of students are not currently looking for jobs, it is important that students understand the impact social media can have on their future. Recent statistics show that hiring managers are using online profiles to make employment decisions. Money Magazine cited recent recruiting polls that stated “93% of hiring managers will review a candidate’s social profile before making a hiring decision. And that review matters: 55% have reconsidered a candidate based on what they find, with most (61%) of those double-takes being negative.” This reveals that students, even as high schoolers,  must be cognizant of what they post on social media. This aligns with “ISTE 5: Advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.”I looked at different aspects of this standard, providing general guidelines for safe and responsible use of information and technology. Also, I took a more in-depth look at Snapchat, an App that students use consistently and need to understand the revisions of its new privacy policy.

I looked through the different resources presented and I believe that students would find “Manners Matter Infographic” informational. It presents some basic information for students to keep in mind as their time spent online continues to increase. I think a beneficial activity would be handing out this graphic and allowing students to discuss the importance of the information in their own lives. It is important that students are aware of these different issues due to the lasting effects negative online activity can have on individuals.

http://www.knowthenet.org.uk/infographic/be-careful-trolling-can-happen-anyone (Links to an external site.)

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In addition, I knew before my internship placement that social media plays a large role in student’s lives, but I did not know the extent until interacting with students daily. I have been amazed how often I have to tell students to put away their phones as they are on Snapchat or Instagram. I have recently learned that Facebook is for “old people.” ha. I conducted some research and MarketWatch published an article on Snapchat’s recently updated privacy policy. Based on the prevalence of Snapchat at the high school level, it is important that students understand how their snapchats can be accessed by third parties. Also, I think it is important that students understand the ambiguous language in privacy policies. I think this article would be eye-opening for some students and would provide students a more comprehensive understanding of Snapchat’s opaque privacy policy.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/snapchats-new-scary-privacy-policy-has-left-users-outraged-2015-10-29 (Links to an external site.)

I think these three resources would work well together to begin the conversation with students about their online and App activity. The infographic gives students a broad idea of what is important and then the Snapchat article presents evidence regarding one commonly used App.

Work Cited:

Davidson, J. (2014). The 7 Social Media Mistakes Most Likely to Cost You a Job.Money Magazine. Retrieved from http://time.com/money/3510967/jobvite-social-media-profiles-job-applicants/

French, S. (2015). Snapchat’s new ‘scary’ privacy policy has left users outraged. MarketWatch. Retrieved from http://www.marketwatch.com/story/snapchats-new-scary-privacy-policy-has-left-users-outraged-2015-10-29

Manners Matter: Be a better digital citizen. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.knowthenet.org. uk/infographic/be-careful-trolling-can-happen-anyone

 

 

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About powelli

Seattle Pacific University Graduate Student - Master's in Teaching - Anticipated Graduation August, 2016.
This entry was posted in Media, Research, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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